The STELLAR Project

 

The STELLAR Project:

Strategies for Technology Enhanced Learning and Literacy through ARt

The STELLAR Project is a collaborative professional development initiative involving five high poverty rural school districts in Lane County, Oregon; the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art (JSMA); the Lane Education Service District (Lane ESD); the Oregon Writing Project (OWP); and the University of Oregon’s Center for Advanced Technology in Education (CATE). The goal of the STELLAR Project is to provide teachers and administrators in high-need, rural schools with intensive and sustained professional development in evidenced-based strategies for teaching the visual arts in ways that lead to the following student outcomes: (a) enhanced visual literacy, (b) improved reading and writing of informational text, (c) increased digital literacy skills, (d) the integration of visual literacy, thinking, and informational writing across the curriculum, and (e) proficiency related to national standards in visual arts (NAEA), writing informational text (CCSS), and use of technology (ISTE).

Go to the STELLAR Project website:

http://stellarproject.uoregon.edu/

 

The STILTS Project

Title of Project: The STILTS Project: Strategies for Technology-enhanced Inquiry Learning and Teaching in Science

Director: Lynne Anderson-Inman, Ph.D.

Funding agency: Improving Teacher Quality: Oregon University/School Partnership Program

Description: 

The STILTS Project is a collaborative effort between: (a) two professional development units in the University of Oregon’s College of Education (the Center for Advanced Technology in Education and the Oregon Writing Project); (b) a research and outreach unit in the College of Arts and Sciences (STEM CORE); and (c) multiple Oregon high need/high poverty rural school districts. Teacher and administrator participants will engage in a 15-month high quality, intensive professional development program designed to address the unique instructional challenges and geographic isolation of educators in rural schools by using a highly successful combination of short professional development institutes; biweekly workshops in a virtual 3D immersive world; reading discussion groups, and peer mentoring.

The goal of the STILTS Project is to increase teachers’ knowledge of and skill in using inquiry-based strategies for teaching and learning aligned with Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) and Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts. Specifically, the STILTS Project will provide professional development on strategies for implementing the NGSS three-dimensional approach to science instruction that calls for inquiry-based instruction designed to integrate (1) “disciplinary core ideas”, (2) “cross cutting concepts”, and (3) scientific “practices” – behaviors that scientists engage in as they investigate theories about the natural world. In addition, participants will develop and demonstrate expertise in: (a) establishing a classroom culture of inquiry; (b) planning lessons that balance science content and practices; (c) adopting strategies that make scientific thinking visible; (d) encouraging cross disciplinary investigation; (e) improving students’ scientific reading, writing, and reasoning; (f) integrating effective technology tools and online resources; (g) facilitating argument writing in which scientific claims are supported by evidence and logic; and (h) linking inquiry-based instruction with inquiry-based assessment. Expected outcomes include increases in participating teachers’ science content and pedagogical knowledge, change in teacher practice related to science inquiry and scientific writing, and improved academic achievement by students.

 

Lynne Anderson-Inman, Ph.D., Principal Investigator and Project Director

Sampler Archive Project

The Sampler Archive Project is a collaborative effort between the University of Delaware’s Winterthur Program in American Material Culture; the University of Oregon’s Center for Advanced Technology in Education (CATE); and the Sampler Consortium, along with museums and historical societies across the country housing collections of American needlework samplers and related girlhood embroideries. The long-term goal of the Sampler Archive Project is to create a freely available and easily accessible online searchable database with information and high-resolution images of all known American samplers in public and private collections nationally and internationally.

Visit the Sampler Archive Project website.

OWP: Oregon Writing Project

About the Oregon Writing Project at the University of Oregon

We are living in one of the most exciting times in media history.  No matter what career you end up choosing, or what path you end up choosing to travel, you will be a writer for the rest of your life.  As the digital age accelerates, and as more aspects of our lives are conducted online how we present ourselves in writing will only get more important.

It is the crucial way in which we process the world around us. The Oregon Writing Project at the University of Oregon’s (OWP/UO) professional development programs, through their work with teachers of all grade levels and content areas, teaches new strategies to help students become accomplished writers in the digital age. The Internet has billions of readers. What it needs are good writers.

A Network of University-Based Sites

Five regional sites make up the OWP network,  serving teachers from all corners of the state.  Eastern Oregon University, Lewis and Clark, Willamette, University of Oregon and Southern Oregon University each host a site. Sites work with area school districts to offer high-quality professional development programs for educators. National research studies  have confirmed significant gains in writing performance among students of teachers who have participated in Oregon Writing Project programs.

Program Model

OWP sites share a national program model, adhering to a set of shared principles and practices for teacher’s professional development. In addition to developing a cadre of local teachers called Teacher Consultants, OWP/UO also develops a cadre of Technology Teacher Consultants.  OWP/UO designs and delivers customized in-service programs for local schools, districts through participation in NWP’s  Special Focus Networks:  Rural, Technology and ELL.  Additionally, OWP/UO delivers customized inservice programs through  Partnership Programs and Embedded Institutes.

National research studies (http://www.nwp.org/cs/public/print/doc/results.csp)

Website: owp.uoregon.edu


 

Current OWP Projects

Title of Project: Oregon Writing Project Summer Institute
Directors:
Lynne Anderson-Inmann, Director
Peggy Marconi, Associate Director
Funding Agency: National Writing Project, University of Oregon
Date: June 21 – July16
Contact Person: Peggy Marconi
Web Site: owp.uoregon.edu

The Oregon Writing Project Summer Institute emphasizes current research and strategies for teaching writing to students, for improving teachers’ own writing, and for enhancing teacher’s leadership skills.  Tools and techniques for integrating technology to support literacy instruction are embedded throughout.  The practicum provides follow-up activities for applying new strategies and extends teachers’ leadership skills in writing, publishing, and professional development. Participation in the Oregon Writing Project influences teachers’ classroom practices and their overall professional pursuits. The collegial effect OWP training builds among school staff members and participants forms the foundation of all other Writing Project activities.


Title of Project: OWP by the Sea
Directors:
Lynne Anderson-Inmann, Director
Peggy Marconi, Associate Director
Funding Agency: National Writing Project/Participation Fees
Date: August 21 – August 22
Contact Person: Peggy Marconi
Web Site: owp.uoregon.edu

Oregon Writing Project hosts an annual writing retreat, OWP by the Sea, in picturesque Charleston Bay on the Oregon coast.  This summer retreat creates time and space for writing project colleagues to write and share their work.  Special guests include prominent authors who share their work and celebrate teachers as writers in the activities of the retreat. This three-day retreat takes place each year in late August.


Title of Project: Rural School’s Network
Directors:
Lynne Anderson-Inmann, Director
Peggy Marconi, Associate Director
Funding Agency: National Writing Project
Date: September 2009 – June 2010
Contact Person: Peggy Marconi
Web Site: owp.uoregon.edu

The Oregon Writing Project at the University of Oregon provides an intensive professional development program for rural schools located in Grant County, Oregon. Grant County is 4,528 square miles of cattle country, arroyos, high prairies and forestland in Eastern Oregon. Several of these participating school districts serve fewer than 50 students. In addition to learning about new strategies and technologies for improving student writing, teachers develop a vision for creating a technology-rich literacy program at their schools and identify individual professional development needs to make this vision a reality. The two-day institute is followed by ongoing support from OWP/UO Tech Teacher Consultants using a variety of communication technologies. This project builds on our site’s experience working with rural schools in a way that builds a professional learning community and fosters classroom instruction that prepares students for 21st century success.


Title of Project: Partnerships/ In-services
Directors:
Lynne Anderson-Inmann, Director
Peggy Marconi, Associate Director
Funding Agency: National Writing Project, Participating School Districts
Date: June 2009 – June 2010
Contact Person: Peggy Marconi
Web Site: owp.uoregon.edu

OWP/UO sponsors thousands of hours of professional development workshops during the school year.  Our workshops address local issues and the particular needs of schools, teachers and students in their school communities.

From Portland to Dayville, OWP/UO has built up long-term partnerships with school districts across the state to help their students meet writing benchmarks and standards. At the district level, such partnerships build existing on-site leadership through customized workshop training and long-term, ongoing, support systems. Statewide, such partnerships share knowledge and experience across districts as they enhance the confidence and comfort level of teacher leaders working with their peers.


Title of Project: Digital Is
Directors:
Lynne Anderson-Inmann, Director
Peggy Marconi, Associate Director

Funding Agency:National Writing Project

Date: September 2009 – April 2010
Contact Person: Peggy Marconi
Web Site: owp.uoregon.edu

The Oregon Writing project and the National Writing Project partnered to develop a series of “webinars” for the professional development of teachers interested in the integration of technology as part of the learning environment.  These “webinairs” are available for all teachers through the National Writing Project web site and also on the Oregon Writing Project web site.  Our goal is to remind teachers of their potential for change and demonstrate ways teachers use technology as a natural part of the learning environment.